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Spoofed porn web site lists

Editor's Note: This article was updated on 5/8/09 from a previous version published on 3/3/08, and the original, published on 12/15/06.

No matter how you arrive at an unsafe Web site, it's all downhill from there. Phishers will attempt to coerce you into disclosing your address, credit card number, or social security number. Or maybe adware engines will start sprouting pop-ups over your screen like a field of clover. Worse, your computer may become part of a botnet, its processing power used to send spam and infections to others, possibly even in your name. Here are nine telltale signs you're swimming in dangerous waters, with tips to help keep you firmly in the safety zone.

Before we dive in, take note of two tools to help warn you of dangerous sites. McAfee SiteAdvisor for Internet Explorer and Firefox and AVG LinkScanner assess the hazards of sites you visit, and are available for Firefox or Internet Explorer. Online Armor is one firewall that scans sites in real time based on traceable patterns of malicious software behavior. Also check out our Security Starter Kit for an excellent set of tools that defend against potential threats.

Sign 1: Pop-up city
You click a search result and are suddenly bombarded with no fewer than 10 porn pop-ups. Back out immediately by right-clicking the pop-up in your task bar and selecting 'close' or by killing the EXE in your Task Manager. It might also help to press Alt-F4 to close your browser. Then run a malicious software scanner and remover to assess and fix the damage-- Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a good start.

Sign 2: Where's the EULA?
Rogue antivirus apps often scare you into parting with your credit card number by informing you it's found bogus spyware on your machine ( it !) If you're about to sign up for or purchase a service and aren't prompted to accept an end-user license agreement, nor are you offered a privacy policy to view. Shady site proprietors often disclose their intentions in the privacy policy or EULA, so you should always read carefully! The free tool EULAlyzer (from the makers of SpywareBlaster) is a great help because it analyzes license agreements and notes any unusual or possibly dangerous language. An upgrade to the professional version is available for about $20.

Editor's Note: This article was updated on 5/8/09 from a previous version published on 3/3/08, and the original, published on 12/15/06.

No matter how you arrive at an unsafe Web site, it's all downhill from there. Phishers will attempt to coerce you into disclosing your address, credit card number, or social security number. Or maybe adware engines will start sprouting pop-ups over your screen like a field of clover. Worse, your computer may become part of a botnet, its processing power used to send spam and infections to others, possibly even in your name. Here are nine telltale signs you're swimming in dangerous waters, with tips to help keep you firmly in the safety zone.

Before we dive in, take note of two tools to help warn you of dangerous sites. McAfee SiteAdvisor for Internet Explorer and Firefox and AVG LinkScanner assess the hazards of sites you visit, and are available for Firefox or Internet Explorer. Online Armor is one firewall that scans sites in real time based on traceable patterns of malicious software behavior. Also check out our Security Starter Kit for an excellent set of tools that defend against potential threats.

Sign 1: Pop-up city
You click a search result and are suddenly bombarded with no fewer than 10 porn pop-ups. Back out immediately by right-clicking the pop-up in your task bar and selecting 'close' or by killing the EXE in your Task Manager. It might also help to press Alt-F4 to close your browser. Then run a malicious software scanner and remover to assess and fix the damage-- Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a good start.

Sign 2: Where's the EULA?
Rogue antivirus apps often scare you into parting with your credit card number by informing you it's found bogus spyware on your machine ( it !) If you're about to sign up for or purchase a service and aren't prompted to accept an end-user license agreement, nor are you offered a privacy policy to view. Shady site proprietors often disclose their intentions in the privacy policy or EULA, so you should always read carefully! The free tool EULAlyzer (from the makers of SpywareBlaster) is a great help because it analyzes license agreements and notes any unusual or possibly dangerous language. An upgrade to the professional version is available for about $20.

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217 shares 5

Editor's Note: This article was updated on 5/8/09 from a previous version published on 3/3/08, and the original, published on 12/15/06.

No matter how you arrive at an unsafe Web site, it's all downhill from there. Phishers will attempt to coerce you into disclosing your address, credit card number, or social security number. Or maybe adware engines will start sprouting pop-ups over your screen like a field of clover. Worse, your computer may become part of a botnet, its processing power used to send spam and infections to others, possibly even in your name. Here are nine telltale signs you're swimming in dangerous waters, with tips to help keep you firmly in the safety zone.

Before we dive in, take note of two tools to help warn you of dangerous sites. McAfee SiteAdvisor for Internet Explorer and Firefox and AVG LinkScanner assess the hazards of sites you visit, and are available for Firefox or Internet Explorer. Online Armor is one firewall that scans sites in real time based on traceable patterns of malicious software behavior. Also check out our Security Starter Kit for an excellent set of tools that defend against potential threats.

Sign 1: Pop-up city
You click a search result and are suddenly bombarded with no fewer than 10 porn pop-ups. Back out immediately by right-clicking the pop-up in your task bar and selecting 'close' or by killing the EXE in your Task Manager. It might also help to press Alt-F4 to close your browser. Then run a malicious software scanner and remover to assess and fix the damage-- Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a good start.

Sign 2: Where's the EULA?
Rogue antivirus apps often scare you into parting with your credit card number by informing you it's found bogus spyware on your machine ( it !) If you're about to sign up for or purchase a service and aren't prompted to accept an end-user license agreement, nor are you offered a privacy policy to view. Shady site proprietors often disclose their intentions in the privacy policy or EULA, so you should always read carefully! The free tool EULAlyzer (from the makers of SpywareBlaster) is a great help because it analyzes license agreements and notes any unusual or possibly dangerous language. An upgrade to the professional version is available for about $20.

  • e-mail
217 shares 5

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

spoofed porn web site lists

Editor's Note: This article was updated on 5/8/09 from a previous version published on 3/3/08, and the original, published on 12/15/06.

No matter how you arrive at an unsafe Web site, it's all downhill from there. Phishers will attempt to coerce you into disclosing your address, credit card number, or social security number. Or maybe adware engines will start sprouting pop-ups over your screen like a field of clover. Worse, your computer may become part of a botnet, its processing power used to send spam and infections to others, possibly even in your name. Here are nine telltale signs you're swimming in dangerous waters, with tips to help keep you firmly in the safety zone.

Before we dive in, take note of two tools to help warn you of dangerous sites. McAfee SiteAdvisor for Internet Explorer and Firefox and AVG LinkScanner assess the hazards of sites you visit, and are available for Firefox or Internet Explorer. Online Armor is one firewall that scans sites in real time based on traceable patterns of malicious software behavior. Also check out our Security Starter Kit for an excellent set of tools that defend against potential threats.

Sign 1: Pop-up city
You click a search result and are suddenly bombarded with no fewer than 10 porn pop-ups. Back out immediately by right-clicking the pop-up in your task bar and selecting 'close' or by killing the EXE in your Task Manager. It might also help to press Alt-F4 to close your browser. Then run a malicious software scanner and remover to assess and fix the damage-- Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a good start.

Sign 2: Where's the EULA?
Rogue antivirus apps often scare you into parting with your credit card number by informing you it's found bogus spyware on your machine ( it !) If you're about to sign up for or purchase a service and aren't prompted to accept an end-user license agreement, nor are you offered a privacy policy to view. Shady site proprietors often disclose their intentions in the privacy policy or EULA, so you should always read carefully! The free tool EULAlyzer (from the makers of SpywareBlaster) is a great help because it analyzes license agreements and notes any unusual or possibly dangerous language. An upgrade to the professional version is available for about $20.

  • e-mail
217 shares 5

Editor's Note: This article was updated on 5/8/09 from a previous version published on 3/3/08, and the original, published on 12/15/06.

No matter how you arrive at an unsafe Web site, it's all downhill from there. Phishers will attempt to coerce you into disclosing your address, credit card number, or social security number. Or maybe adware engines will start sprouting pop-ups over your screen like a field of clover. Worse, your computer may become part of a botnet, its processing power used to send spam and infections to others, possibly even in your name. Here are nine telltale signs you're swimming in dangerous waters, with tips to help keep you firmly in the safety zone.

Before we dive in, take note of two tools to help warn you of dangerous sites. McAfee SiteAdvisor for Internet Explorer and Firefox and AVG LinkScanner assess the hazards of sites you visit, and are available for Firefox or Internet Explorer. Online Armor is one firewall that scans sites in real time based on traceable patterns of malicious software behavior. Also check out our Security Starter Kit for an excellent set of tools that defend against potential threats.

Sign 1: Pop-up city
You click a search result and are suddenly bombarded with no fewer than 10 porn pop-ups. Back out immediately by right-clicking the pop-up in your task bar and selecting 'close' or by killing the EXE in your Task Manager. It might also help to press Alt-F4 to close your browser. Then run a malicious software scanner and remover to assess and fix the damage-- Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a good start.

Sign 2: Where's the EULA?
Rogue antivirus apps often scare you into parting with your credit card number by informing you it's found bogus spyware on your machine ( it !) If you're about to sign up for or purchase a service and aren't prompted to accept an end-user license agreement, nor are you offered a privacy policy to view. Shady site proprietors often disclose their intentions in the privacy policy or EULA, so you should always read carefully! The free tool EULAlyzer (from the makers of SpywareBlaster) is a great help because it analyzes license agreements and notes any unusual or possibly dangerous language. An upgrade to the professional version is available for about $20.

  • e-mail
217 shares 5

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.