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Ways to overcome masturbation

Encountering obstacles is one thing we all have in common. The thing that sets us apart, however, is how we deal with obstacles. Some people allow obstacles to derail them; others have learned to jump the hurdles while running.

The majority of obstacles can be avoided. They are the result of unmanaged emotions, ingrained habits and habitual mistakes we make with other people. Unattended, these obstacles become emotional thieves that we allow into our lives. They steal our focus, sap our mental energy and, sometimes, thwart our most important initiatives. What can we do to close the door on these obstacles so we can capitalize on our opportunities to succeed? Here are eight strategies to help.

We all have a built-in radar that tells us when we are about to make a mistake involving people. But we often choose not to heed that signal. Research shows that one in four startups fail. One of the major causes is managerial incompetence.

Choosing the right people, especially the right co-founder, is crucial. Some entrepreneurs end up picking a co-founder based on friendship, on having been like-minded buddies working together in the past. In the excitement of starting a new venture, you may ignore the feeling in your gut that tells you the person you are about to pick does not have the managerial competence for this next step. They may lack execution skills, or they may be weak on strategic thinking. Instead of bolstering your weaknesses, they compound them. Don't let this be an obstacle to your success.

"Living too high for the business" is another cause for failure cited in  research . That's one obstacle you can easily avoid. It's not uncommon to witness a startup that gets some funding and begins to spend like a Fortune 500 company. Euphoria and the thrill of the win replace common sense. We all recall the famous 1993 "Shrimp and Weenies" memo sent to all Microsoft employees asking them to be frugal with company money—to order weenies, for example, not shrimp, when the company pays the bill. It asked employees to think of Microsoft as "the biggest small company in the world." Keeping the small company mentality is good advice, not only for startups but for any company.

A growing body of research in behavioral economics indicates we use an irrational approach to decision-making. What exactly is behavioral economics? One of the best definitions comes from British economist Dan Evans: "Put simply, behavioural economics argues that human beings' decision-making is guided by the evolutionary baggage which we bring with us to the present day." Not understanding how we make our decisions can have profound consequences on our behavior. 

We need to rethink how we make decisions, and recognize which repeated decision-making processes don't serve us well so we can learn to avoid them. As Albert Camus said, "Life is the sum of all your choices." Gaining insights into irrational motives that affect our personal and work lives is a good place to start.

These seven tips can help you avoid falling into irrational-trap thinking.

2. Preempt customer revenge. In his subsequent book, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic At Work And At Home , Ariely explores the need for people to seek revenge for poor customer service and other annoyances. For example, when a customer rep interrupted an explanation to take a personal phone call, and returned to the person without an apology for the interruption, it significantly increased the odds that the person would write a scathing review online for other potential customers to see. Ariely provides a formula for neutralizing the desire for revenge: "1 annoyance + 1 apology = 0 annoyance."  (For more insights on customer revenge, see Ariely's video ,"The Case For Revenge.")

RELATED: How to Handle Difficult Conversations

7. Beware of those who say, "It will set a precedent." All of us have at some point decided not to adopt a decision because someone said, "We can't do this. It will set a precedent." This is the wrong reason for abandoning a decision. Whether or not it sets a precedent is irrelevant. As Stuart Sutherland, British psychologist and author of Irrationality , says: "The decision should be made on its own merits." Guard against discarding what could be a very good decision because of faulty reasoning. Setting a precedent may be a legitimate reason for not adopting a certain course of action, but don't allow it to sway you before carefully examining the value of the decision.

Read more leadership and management articles . 

Bruna Martinuzzi is the founder of Clarion Enterprises Ltd. , and the author of two books: Presenting with Credibility: Practical Tools and Techniques for Effective Presentations and The Leader as a Mensch: Become the Kind of Person Others Want to Follow.

Photo: iStockphoto

Encountering obstacles is one thing we all have in common. The thing that sets us apart, however, is how we deal with obstacles. Some people allow obstacles to derail them; others have learned to jump the hurdles while running.

The majority of obstacles can be avoided. They are the result of unmanaged emotions, ingrained habits and habitual mistakes we make with other people. Unattended, these obstacles become emotional thieves that we allow into our lives. They steal our focus, sap our mental energy and, sometimes, thwart our most important initiatives. What can we do to close the door on these obstacles so we can capitalize on our opportunities to succeed? Here are eight strategies to help.

We all have a built-in radar that tells us when we are about to make a mistake involving people. But we often choose not to heed that signal. Research shows that one in four startups fail. One of the major causes is managerial incompetence.

Choosing the right people, especially the right co-founder, is crucial. Some entrepreneurs end up picking a co-founder based on friendship, on having been like-minded buddies working together in the past. In the excitement of starting a new venture, you may ignore the feeling in your gut that tells you the person you are about to pick does not have the managerial competence for this next step. They may lack execution skills, or they may be weak on strategic thinking. Instead of bolstering your weaknesses, they compound them. Don't let this be an obstacle to your success.

"Living too high for the business" is another cause for failure cited in  research . That's one obstacle you can easily avoid. It's not uncommon to witness a startup that gets some funding and begins to spend like a Fortune 500 company. Euphoria and the thrill of the win replace common sense. We all recall the famous 1993 "Shrimp and Weenies" memo sent to all Microsoft employees asking them to be frugal with company money—to order weenies, for example, not shrimp, when the company pays the bill. It asked employees to think of Microsoft as "the biggest small company in the world." Keeping the small company mentality is good advice, not only for startups but for any company.

Encountering obstacles is one thing we all have in common. The thing that sets us apart, however, is how we deal with obstacles. Some people allow obstacles to derail them; others have learned to jump the hurdles while running.

The majority of obstacles can be avoided. They are the result of unmanaged emotions, ingrained habits and habitual mistakes we make with other people. Unattended, these obstacles become emotional thieves that we allow into our lives. They steal our focus, sap our mental energy and, sometimes, thwart our most important initiatives. What can we do to close the door on these obstacles so we can capitalize on our opportunities to succeed? Here are eight strategies to help.

We all have a built-in radar that tells us when we are about to make a mistake involving people. But we often choose not to heed that signal. Research shows that one in four startups fail. One of the major causes is managerial incompetence.

Choosing the right people, especially the right co-founder, is crucial. Some entrepreneurs end up picking a co-founder based on friendship, on having been like-minded buddies working together in the past. In the excitement of starting a new venture, you may ignore the feeling in your gut that tells you the person you are about to pick does not have the managerial competence for this next step. They may lack execution skills, or they may be weak on strategic thinking. Instead of bolstering your weaknesses, they compound them. Don't let this be an obstacle to your success.

"Living too high for the business" is another cause for failure cited in  research . That's one obstacle you can easily avoid. It's not uncommon to witness a startup that gets some funding and begins to spend like a Fortune 500 company. Euphoria and the thrill of the win replace common sense. We all recall the famous 1993 "Shrimp and Weenies" memo sent to all Microsoft employees asking them to be frugal with company money—to order weenies, for example, not shrimp, when the company pays the bill. It asked employees to think of Microsoft as "the biggest small company in the world." Keeping the small company mentality is good advice, not only for startups but for any company.

A growing body of research in behavioral economics indicates we use an irrational approach to decision-making. What exactly is behavioral economics? One of the best definitions comes from British economist Dan Evans: "Put simply, behavioural economics argues that human beings' decision-making is guided by the evolutionary baggage which we bring with us to the present day." Not understanding how we make our decisions can have profound consequences on our behavior. 

We need to rethink how we make decisions, and recognize which repeated decision-making processes don't serve us well so we can learn to avoid them. As Albert Camus said, "Life is the sum of all your choices." Gaining insights into irrational motives that affect our personal and work lives is a good place to start.

These seven tips can help you avoid falling into irrational-trap thinking.

2. Preempt customer revenge. In his subsequent book, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic At Work And At Home , Ariely explores the need for people to seek revenge for poor customer service and other annoyances. For example, when a customer rep interrupted an explanation to take a personal phone call, and returned to the person without an apology for the interruption, it significantly increased the odds that the person would write a scathing review online for other potential customers to see. Ariely provides a formula for neutralizing the desire for revenge: "1 annoyance + 1 apology = 0 annoyance."  (For more insights on customer revenge, see Ariely's video ,"The Case For Revenge.")

RELATED: How to Handle Difficult Conversations

7. Beware of those who say, "It will set a precedent." All of us have at some point decided not to adopt a decision because someone said, "We can't do this. It will set a precedent." This is the wrong reason for abandoning a decision. Whether or not it sets a precedent is irrelevant. As Stuart Sutherland, British psychologist and author of Irrationality , says: "The decision should be made on its own merits." Guard against discarding what could be a very good decision because of faulty reasoning. Setting a precedent may be a legitimate reason for not adopting a certain course of action, but don't allow it to sway you before carefully examining the value of the decision.

Read more leadership and management articles . 

Bruna Martinuzzi is the founder of Clarion Enterprises Ltd. , and the author of two books: Presenting with Credibility: Practical Tools and Techniques for Effective Presentations and The Leader as a Mensch: Become the Kind of Person Others Want to Follow.

Photo: iStockphoto

Data from my well-being survey recently revealed that positive self-views (or feeling good about oneself, a general belief that we are good, worthwhile human beings) were the best predictor of happiness —even more so than 19 other emotional processes including gratitude and strong personal relationships. Positive self-views emerge from self-esteem, self-acceptance, and self-worth, among other things.

Why are positive self-views so essential to well-being? Because these views not only affect how we feel; they also affect our thoughts and behaviors. When we feel bad about ourselves,  we unconsciously act in ways that end up confirming our beliefs. For example, if we feel like we are not good enough for a good relationship, a good job, or financial stability, we stop pursuing these goals with the intensity required to reach them, or we sabotage ourselves along the way.

So how do we break out of the negative cycle? Below I highlight four ways that you can start to promote positive self-views and begin to change the patterns of your life.

When we don’t feel good about ourselves, it’s easy to think that there’s something fundamentally wrong with us; it feels deeply rooted and unchangeable. In reality, though, we may have failed to clarify (and then pursue) exactly what would make us feel like a person that we could love.

When we don’t feel good about ourselves, it feels deeply rooted and unchangeable. People tend to feel badly about themselves when they feel powerless to get their needs met —so you can start this process by figuring out what your needs are.

ways to overcome masturbation

Encountering obstacles is one thing we all have in common. The thing that sets us apart, however, is how we deal with obstacles. Some people allow obstacles to derail them; others have learned to jump the hurdles while running.

The majority of obstacles can be avoided. They are the result of unmanaged emotions, ingrained habits and habitual mistakes we make with other people. Unattended, these obstacles become emotional thieves that we allow into our lives. They steal our focus, sap our mental energy and, sometimes, thwart our most important initiatives. What can we do to close the door on these obstacles so we can capitalize on our opportunities to succeed? Here are eight strategies to help.

We all have a built-in radar that tells us when we are about to make a mistake involving people. But we often choose not to heed that signal. Research shows that one in four startups fail. One of the major causes is managerial incompetence.

Choosing the right people, especially the right co-founder, is crucial. Some entrepreneurs end up picking a co-founder based on friendship, on having been like-minded buddies working together in the past. In the excitement of starting a new venture, you may ignore the feeling in your gut that tells you the person you are about to pick does not have the managerial competence for this next step. They may lack execution skills, or they may be weak on strategic thinking. Instead of bolstering your weaknesses, they compound them. Don't let this be an obstacle to your success.

"Living too high for the business" is another cause for failure cited in  research . That's one obstacle you can easily avoid. It's not uncommon to witness a startup that gets some funding and begins to spend like a Fortune 500 company. Euphoria and the thrill of the win replace common sense. We all recall the famous 1993 "Shrimp and Weenies" memo sent to all Microsoft employees asking them to be frugal with company money—to order weenies, for example, not shrimp, when the company pays the bill. It asked employees to think of Microsoft as "the biggest small company in the world." Keeping the small company mentality is good advice, not only for startups but for any company.

Encountering obstacles is one thing we all have in common. The thing that sets us apart, however, is how we deal with obstacles. Some people allow obstacles to derail them; others have learned to jump the hurdles while running.

The majority of obstacles can be avoided. They are the result of unmanaged emotions, ingrained habits and habitual mistakes we make with other people. Unattended, these obstacles become emotional thieves that we allow into our lives. They steal our focus, sap our mental energy and, sometimes, thwart our most important initiatives. What can we do to close the door on these obstacles so we can capitalize on our opportunities to succeed? Here are eight strategies to help.

We all have a built-in radar that tells us when we are about to make a mistake involving people. But we often choose not to heed that signal. Research shows that one in four startups fail. One of the major causes is managerial incompetence.

Choosing the right people, especially the right co-founder, is crucial. Some entrepreneurs end up picking a co-founder based on friendship, on having been like-minded buddies working together in the past. In the excitement of starting a new venture, you may ignore the feeling in your gut that tells you the person you are about to pick does not have the managerial competence for this next step. They may lack execution skills, or they may be weak on strategic thinking. Instead of bolstering your weaknesses, they compound them. Don't let this be an obstacle to your success.

"Living too high for the business" is another cause for failure cited in  research . That's one obstacle you can easily avoid. It's not uncommon to witness a startup that gets some funding and begins to spend like a Fortune 500 company. Euphoria and the thrill of the win replace common sense. We all recall the famous 1993 "Shrimp and Weenies" memo sent to all Microsoft employees asking them to be frugal with company money—to order weenies, for example, not shrimp, when the company pays the bill. It asked employees to think of Microsoft as "the biggest small company in the world." Keeping the small company mentality is good advice, not only for startups but for any company.

A growing body of research in behavioral economics indicates we use an irrational approach to decision-making. What exactly is behavioral economics? One of the best definitions comes from British economist Dan Evans: "Put simply, behavioural economics argues that human beings' decision-making is guided by the evolutionary baggage which we bring with us to the present day." Not understanding how we make our decisions can have profound consequences on our behavior. 

We need to rethink how we make decisions, and recognize which repeated decision-making processes don't serve us well so we can learn to avoid them. As Albert Camus said, "Life is the sum of all your choices." Gaining insights into irrational motives that affect our personal and work lives is a good place to start.

These seven tips can help you avoid falling into irrational-trap thinking.

2. Preempt customer revenge. In his subsequent book, The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic At Work And At Home , Ariely explores the need for people to seek revenge for poor customer service and other annoyances. For example, when a customer rep interrupted an explanation to take a personal phone call, and returned to the person without an apology for the interruption, it significantly increased the odds that the person would write a scathing review online for other potential customers to see. Ariely provides a formula for neutralizing the desire for revenge: "1 annoyance + 1 apology = 0 annoyance."  (For more insights on customer revenge, see Ariely's video ,"The Case For Revenge.")

RELATED: How to Handle Difficult Conversations

7. Beware of those who say, "It will set a precedent." All of us have at some point decided not to adopt a decision because someone said, "We can't do this. It will set a precedent." This is the wrong reason for abandoning a decision. Whether or not it sets a precedent is irrelevant. As Stuart Sutherland, British psychologist and author of Irrationality , says: "The decision should be made on its own merits." Guard against discarding what could be a very good decision because of faulty reasoning. Setting a precedent may be a legitimate reason for not adopting a certain course of action, but don't allow it to sway you before carefully examining the value of the decision.

Read more leadership and management articles . 

Bruna Martinuzzi is the founder of Clarion Enterprises Ltd. , and the author of two books: Presenting with Credibility: Practical Tools and Techniques for Effective Presentations and The Leader as a Mensch: Become the Kind of Person Others Want to Follow.

Photo: iStockphoto

Data from my well-being survey recently revealed that positive self-views (or feeling good about oneself, a general belief that we are good, worthwhile human beings) were the best predictor of happiness —even more so than 19 other emotional processes including gratitude and strong personal relationships. Positive self-views emerge from self-esteem, self-acceptance, and self-worth, among other things.

Why are positive self-views so essential to well-being? Because these views not only affect how we feel; they also affect our thoughts and behaviors. When we feel bad about ourselves,  we unconsciously act in ways that end up confirming our beliefs. For example, if we feel like we are not good enough for a good relationship, a good job, or financial stability, we stop pursuing these goals with the intensity required to reach them, or we sabotage ourselves along the way.

So how do we break out of the negative cycle? Below I highlight four ways that you can start to promote positive self-views and begin to change the patterns of your life.

When we don’t feel good about ourselves, it’s easy to think that there’s something fundamentally wrong with us; it feels deeply rooted and unchangeable. In reality, though, we may have failed to clarify (and then pursue) exactly what would make us feel like a person that we could love.

When we don’t feel good about ourselves, it feels deeply rooted and unchangeable. People tend to feel badly about themselves when they feel powerless to get their needs met —so you can start this process by figuring out what your needs are.