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70s porn movie list


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It's a common cliché that they don't make them like they used to but when it comes to 70s cinema, it's really quite true.

Seen as the golden era for Hollywood, when mainstream movies would be imbued with an intelligence and riskiness that has since been somewhat watered down, in just 10 years, we've been given a whole library's worth of rewatchable classics.

To celebrate everything that the 70s brought to movie history, we've assembled a list of the 25 definitive films of the era. Let us know if we've missed any out at the bottom.

One of the most controversial fiilms of the era, Stanley Kubrick's magnum opus gave us an uncomfortable look at a dystopian future where gangs of youths engage in "ultra-violence". Still pertinent now, the Oscar-nominated film was problematic on release due to the high levels of violence. Kubrick himself withdrew the film in the UK where it wasn't seen until 2000, by which time its cult status had grown even larger.

The first R-rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars helped to bring in a new era of gritty crime dramas that typified the edgy cinema of the 70s. Gene Hackman's Oscar-winning turn as a "take no prisoners" cop showcased the breathtaking moral ambiguity that pervaded in films of the era. Unwilling to make the leads overly sympathetic or easy to like, William Friedkin's film was a breath of fresh, or actually rather filthy, air.


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It's a common cliché that they don't make them like they used to but when it comes to 70s cinema, it's really quite true.

Seen as the golden era for Hollywood, when mainstream movies would be imbued with an intelligence and riskiness that has since been somewhat watered down, in just 10 years, we've been given a whole library's worth of rewatchable classics.

To celebrate everything that the 70s brought to movie history, we've assembled a list of the 25 definitive films of the era. Let us know if we've missed any out at the bottom.

One of the most controversial fiilms of the era, Stanley Kubrick's magnum opus gave us an uncomfortable look at a dystopian future where gangs of youths engage in "ultra-violence". Still pertinent now, the Oscar-nominated film was problematic on release due to the high levels of violence. Kubrick himself withdrew the film in the UK where it wasn't seen until 2000, by which time its cult status had grown even larger.

The first R-rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars helped to bring in a new era of gritty crime dramas that typified the edgy cinema of the 70s. Gene Hackman's Oscar-winning turn as a "take no prisoners" cop showcased the breathtaking moral ambiguity that pervaded in films of the era. Unwilling to make the leads overly sympathetic or easy to like, William Friedkin's film was a breath of fresh, or actually rather filthy, air.

Early X-rated movie trailers followed the time-tested exploitation model, promising to show us shocking scenes for our own good, because we need to know what really goes on in the world. In Get What You Pay For , we're promised a peek "behind the camera on an adult-movie set" to "see what kinds of girls work in these pictures." Which is a strange concept, because really, any adult movie shows how porn actresses "relieve their sexual excitement." Where's the exposé here? Still, bonus points to the filmmakers for the baroque synthesizer score that runs under the trailer, and for one of the more accurate titles in porn history.

According to this trailer's voiceover narration, this, "the latest masterpiece of erotic comedy," combines "the hilarity of Some Like It Hot with the freedom of today's screen." It also looks like it combines a $500 budget with the loan of someone's prison-movie set. Nearly all the action appears to take place in one cell, where two male muggers dressed as ladies unexpectedly score with their new female cellmates. The narrator goes to say that Caught In The Can has already been nominated for three Golden Beaver Awards: "Best Story, Best Action, and… well, you get the point."

The production values aren't so sharp on this low-budget, one-room production, and though the narrator refers to it as "the first X-rated Christmas story ever released," the only nod to the yuletide is a tree in the corner. That narrator is what makes this trailer memorable: He unaccountably adopts a W.C. Fields voice, drawling lines like "There's plenty of that white stuff in this picture, and I don't mean snoooow," "Watch Santa Claus shoot his loooad under the Christmas treeee," and "Santa comes but once a year, and he's going to come all over the screeeeen."

An ugly mustachioed man sits on a New York park bench reading Swank , which somehow makes him desirable to female passersby—even those pushing baby carriages. "I don't know why they love me like they do do do," Mustache Man says, while the narrator repeats "Lecher: a man given to excessive or promiscuous sexual indulgence" over and over in a progressively louder voice, as though someone in the recording booth kept saying, "What?"

Blaxploitation porn, anyone? This trailer hits all the hallmarks of both genres, including a funky score and double-entendre lines like "It wasn't always easy coming up against Whitey, although sometimes it was fun." It also contains some over-the-top misogyny, including a scene where the hero inserts a carrot into a woman's vagina, then walks out of the room growling "So long, bitch, enjoy your lunch!" He almost tops that gem in the scene where he walks into a white nightclub, tells one posh dowager that she's won the door prize, then pulls out his penis and rubs it on her face.


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It's a common cliché that they don't make them like they used to but when it comes to 70s cinema, it's really quite true.

Seen as the golden era for Hollywood, when mainstream movies would be imbued with an intelligence and riskiness that has since been somewhat watered down, in just 10 years, we've been given a whole library's worth of rewatchable classics.

To celebrate everything that the 70s brought to movie history, we've assembled a list of the 25 definitive films of the era. Let us know if we've missed any out at the bottom.

One of the most controversial fiilms of the era, Stanley Kubrick's magnum opus gave us an uncomfortable look at a dystopian future where gangs of youths engage in "ultra-violence". Still pertinent now, the Oscar-nominated film was problematic on release due to the high levels of violence. Kubrick himself withdrew the film in the UK where it wasn't seen until 2000, by which time its cult status had grown even larger.

The first R-rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars helped to bring in a new era of gritty crime dramas that typified the edgy cinema of the 70s. Gene Hackman's Oscar-winning turn as a "take no prisoners" cop showcased the breathtaking moral ambiguity that pervaded in films of the era. Unwilling to make the leads overly sympathetic or easy to like, William Friedkin's film was a breath of fresh, or actually rather filthy, air.

Early X-rated movie trailers followed the time-tested exploitation model, promising to show us shocking scenes for our own good, because we need to know what really goes on in the world. In Get What You Pay For , we're promised a peek "behind the camera on an adult-movie set" to "see what kinds of girls work in these pictures." Which is a strange concept, because really, any adult movie shows how porn actresses "relieve their sexual excitement." Where's the exposé here? Still, bonus points to the filmmakers for the baroque synthesizer score that runs under the trailer, and for one of the more accurate titles in porn history.

According to this trailer's voiceover narration, this, "the latest masterpiece of erotic comedy," combines "the hilarity of Some Like It Hot with the freedom of today's screen." It also looks like it combines a $500 budget with the loan of someone's prison-movie set. Nearly all the action appears to take place in one cell, where two male muggers dressed as ladies unexpectedly score with their new female cellmates. The narrator goes to say that Caught In The Can has already been nominated for three Golden Beaver Awards: "Best Story, Best Action, and… well, you get the point."

The production values aren't so sharp on this low-budget, one-room production, and though the narrator refers to it as "the first X-rated Christmas story ever released," the only nod to the yuletide is a tree in the corner. That narrator is what makes this trailer memorable: He unaccountably adopts a W.C. Fields voice, drawling lines like "There's plenty of that white stuff in this picture, and I don't mean snoooow," "Watch Santa Claus shoot his loooad under the Christmas treeee," and "Santa comes but once a year, and he's going to come all over the screeeeen."

An ugly mustachioed man sits on a New York park bench reading Swank , which somehow makes him desirable to female passersby—even those pushing baby carriages. "I don't know why they love me like they do do do," Mustache Man says, while the narrator repeats "Lecher: a man given to excessive or promiscuous sexual indulgence" over and over in a progressively louder voice, as though someone in the recording booth kept saying, "What?"

Blaxploitation porn, anyone? This trailer hits all the hallmarks of both genres, including a funky score and double-entendre lines like "It wasn't always easy coming up against Whitey, although sometimes it was fun." It also contains some over-the-top misogyny, including a scene where the hero inserts a carrot into a woman's vagina, then walks out of the room growling "So long, bitch, enjoy your lunch!" He almost tops that gem in the scene where he walks into a white nightclub, tells one posh dowager that she's won the door prize, then pulls out his penis and rubs it on her face.

Sexploration! - While free love reigned in the western world, famous adult stars like Linda Lovelace and Marilyn Chambers became household names and Berth Milton Sr took Private magazine to a new level, capturing the very essence of female sexual liberation and exploring new sexual avenues.

Join Europe`s biggest porn archive TODAY and enjoy over 50 years of hard core films and images from Private, the studio that put the “P” in porn. From the swinging 60`s through to recent years, find exclusive content guaranteed to bring back some very powerful memories. Private’s 50 years of publications and unique classic movie archive are all on privateclasics.com. Daily updates, special offers, and a seemingly unlimited supply of amazing women who will keep you dreaming of the golden years of porn. Only on Private Classics.

70s porn movie list


Clickbank Marketplace Ads           

It's a common cliché that they don't make them like they used to but when it comes to 70s cinema, it's really quite true.

Seen as the golden era for Hollywood, when mainstream movies would be imbued with an intelligence and riskiness that has since been somewhat watered down, in just 10 years, we've been given a whole library's worth of rewatchable classics.

To celebrate everything that the 70s brought to movie history, we've assembled a list of the 25 definitive films of the era. Let us know if we've missed any out at the bottom.

One of the most controversial fiilms of the era, Stanley Kubrick's magnum opus gave us an uncomfortable look at a dystopian future where gangs of youths engage in "ultra-violence". Still pertinent now, the Oscar-nominated film was problematic on release due to the high levels of violence. Kubrick himself withdrew the film in the UK where it wasn't seen until 2000, by which time its cult status had grown even larger.

The first R-rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars helped to bring in a new era of gritty crime dramas that typified the edgy cinema of the 70s. Gene Hackman's Oscar-winning turn as a "take no prisoners" cop showcased the breathtaking moral ambiguity that pervaded in films of the era. Unwilling to make the leads overly sympathetic or easy to like, William Friedkin's film was a breath of fresh, or actually rather filthy, air.

Early X-rated movie trailers followed the time-tested exploitation model, promising to show us shocking scenes for our own good, because we need to know what really goes on in the world. In Get What You Pay For , we're promised a peek "behind the camera on an adult-movie set" to "see what kinds of girls work in these pictures." Which is a strange concept, because really, any adult movie shows how porn actresses "relieve their sexual excitement." Where's the exposé here? Still, bonus points to the filmmakers for the baroque synthesizer score that runs under the trailer, and for one of the more accurate titles in porn history.

According to this trailer's voiceover narration, this, "the latest masterpiece of erotic comedy," combines "the hilarity of Some Like It Hot with the freedom of today's screen." It also looks like it combines a $500 budget with the loan of someone's prison-movie set. Nearly all the action appears to take place in one cell, where two male muggers dressed as ladies unexpectedly score with their new female cellmates. The narrator goes to say that Caught In The Can has already been nominated for three Golden Beaver Awards: "Best Story, Best Action, and… well, you get the point."

The production values aren't so sharp on this low-budget, one-room production, and though the narrator refers to it as "the first X-rated Christmas story ever released," the only nod to the yuletide is a tree in the corner. That narrator is what makes this trailer memorable: He unaccountably adopts a W.C. Fields voice, drawling lines like "There's plenty of that white stuff in this picture, and I don't mean snoooow," "Watch Santa Claus shoot his loooad under the Christmas treeee," and "Santa comes but once a year, and he's going to come all over the screeeeen."

An ugly mustachioed man sits on a New York park bench reading Swank , which somehow makes him desirable to female passersby—even those pushing baby carriages. "I don't know why they love me like they do do do," Mustache Man says, while the narrator repeats "Lecher: a man given to excessive or promiscuous sexual indulgence" over and over in a progressively louder voice, as though someone in the recording booth kept saying, "What?"

Blaxploitation porn, anyone? This trailer hits all the hallmarks of both genres, including a funky score and double-entendre lines like "It wasn't always easy coming up against Whitey, although sometimes it was fun." It also contains some over-the-top misogyny, including a scene where the hero inserts a carrot into a woman's vagina, then walks out of the room growling "So long, bitch, enjoy your lunch!" He almost tops that gem in the scene where he walks into a white nightclub, tells one posh dowager that she's won the door prize, then pulls out his penis and rubs it on her face.


Clickbank Marketplace Ads           

It's a common cliché that they don't make them like they used to but when it comes to 70s cinema, it's really quite true.

Seen as the golden era for Hollywood, when mainstream movies would be imbued with an intelligence and riskiness that has since been somewhat watered down, in just 10 years, we've been given a whole library's worth of rewatchable classics.

To celebrate everything that the 70s brought to movie history, we've assembled a list of the 25 definitive films of the era. Let us know if we've missed any out at the bottom.

One of the most controversial fiilms of the era, Stanley Kubrick's magnum opus gave us an uncomfortable look at a dystopian future where gangs of youths engage in "ultra-violence". Still pertinent now, the Oscar-nominated film was problematic on release due to the high levels of violence. Kubrick himself withdrew the film in the UK where it wasn't seen until 2000, by which time its cult status had grown even larger.

The first R-rated film to win Best Picture at the Oscars helped to bring in a new era of gritty crime dramas that typified the edgy cinema of the 70s. Gene Hackman's Oscar-winning turn as a "take no prisoners" cop showcased the breathtaking moral ambiguity that pervaded in films of the era. Unwilling to make the leads overly sympathetic or easy to like, William Friedkin's film was a breath of fresh, or actually rather filthy, air.

Early X-rated movie trailers followed the time-tested exploitation model, promising to show us shocking scenes for our own good, because we need to know what really goes on in the world. In Get What You Pay For , we're promised a peek "behind the camera on an adult-movie set" to "see what kinds of girls work in these pictures." Which is a strange concept, because really, any adult movie shows how porn actresses "relieve their sexual excitement." Where's the exposé here? Still, bonus points to the filmmakers for the baroque synthesizer score that runs under the trailer, and for one of the more accurate titles in porn history.

According to this trailer's voiceover narration, this, "the latest masterpiece of erotic comedy," combines "the hilarity of Some Like It Hot with the freedom of today's screen." It also looks like it combines a $500 budget with the loan of someone's prison-movie set. Nearly all the action appears to take place in one cell, where two male muggers dressed as ladies unexpectedly score with their new female cellmates. The narrator goes to say that Caught In The Can has already been nominated for three Golden Beaver Awards: "Best Story, Best Action, and… well, you get the point."

The production values aren't so sharp on this low-budget, one-room production, and though the narrator refers to it as "the first X-rated Christmas story ever released," the only nod to the yuletide is a tree in the corner. That narrator is what makes this trailer memorable: He unaccountably adopts a W.C. Fields voice, drawling lines like "There's plenty of that white stuff in this picture, and I don't mean snoooow," "Watch Santa Claus shoot his loooad under the Christmas treeee," and "Santa comes but once a year, and he's going to come all over the screeeeen."

An ugly mustachioed man sits on a New York park bench reading Swank , which somehow makes him desirable to female passersby—even those pushing baby carriages. "I don't know why they love me like they do do do," Mustache Man says, while the narrator repeats "Lecher: a man given to excessive or promiscuous sexual indulgence" over and over in a progressively louder voice, as though someone in the recording booth kept saying, "What?"

Blaxploitation porn, anyone? This trailer hits all the hallmarks of both genres, including a funky score and double-entendre lines like "It wasn't always easy coming up against Whitey, although sometimes it was fun." It also contains some over-the-top misogyny, including a scene where the hero inserts a carrot into a woman's vagina, then walks out of the room growling "So long, bitch, enjoy your lunch!" He almost tops that gem in the scene where he walks into a white nightclub, tells one posh dowager that she's won the door prize, then pulls out his penis and rubs it on her face.

Sexploration! - While free love reigned in the western world, famous adult stars like Linda Lovelace and Marilyn Chambers became household names and Berth Milton Sr took Private magazine to a new level, capturing the very essence of female sexual liberation and exploring new sexual avenues.

Join Europe`s biggest porn archive TODAY and enjoy over 50 years of hard core films and images from Private, the studio that put the “P” in porn. From the swinging 60`s through to recent years, find exclusive content guaranteed to bring back some very powerful memories. Private’s 50 years of publications and unique classic movie archive are all on privateclasics.com. Daily updates, special offers, and a seemingly unlimited supply of amazing women who will keep you dreaming of the golden years of porn. Only on Private Classics.


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