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Discimination toward gays in hollywood

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

Gender equality is essential for the achievement of human rights for all. Yet discriminatory laws against women persist in every corner of the globe and new discriminatory laws are enacted. In all legal traditions many laws continue to institutionalize second class status for women and girls with regard to nationality and citizenship, health, education, marital rights, employment rights, parental rights, inheritance and property rights. These forms of discrimination against women are incompatible with women’s empowerment.

Women form the majority of the world’s poorest people and the number of women living in rural poverty has increased by 50% since 1975. Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours and produce half of the world’s food, yet they earn only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property 1 . Violence against women throughout the world and in all cultures prevails on an unimaginable scale, and women’s access to justice is often paired with discriminatory obstacles – in law as well as in practice. Multiple forms of discrimination based on gender and other factors such as race, ethnicity, caste, disability, persons affected by HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation or gender identity further compounds the risk of economic hardship, exclusion and violence against women.

In some countries women, unlike men, cannot dress as they like, drive, work at night, inherit property or give evidence in Court. The vast majority of expressly discriminatory laws in force relate to family life, including limiting a woman’s right to marry (or the right not to marry in cases of early forced marriages), divorce and remarry, thus allowing for sex discriminatory marital practices such as wife obedience and polygamy. Laws explicitly mandating “wife obedience” still govern marital relations in many States.

International human rights law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and includes guarantees for men and women to enjoy their civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights equally. While the human rights machinery reaffirm the principles of non-discrimination and equality, Article 15 (1) of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women explicitly provides that States who have ratified the Convention shall accord to women equality with men and article 2 commits States who have ratified the Convention “to take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices which constitute discrimination against women.” 

Thirty years since the Convention’s entry into force, the recognition and enjoyment of equal rights with men still remains elusive for large sections of women around the world. CEDAW has been ratified by 186 States yet has the record number of reservations to core articles such as articles 2 and 6 which impact upon young girls and women’s personal and family life. 

Sexual orientation discrimination includes being treated differently or harassed because of your real or perceived sexual orientation -- whether gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual. This type of discrimination may be illegal in your workplace, depending on where you work.

Although federal laws protect people from workplace discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, religion, sex, age, and disability, there is no federal law that specifically outlaws workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the private sector. (Federal government workers are protected from such discrimination.) Attempts to pass federal legislation that would outlaw sexual orientation discrimination in private workplaces have been unsuccessful to date, although more members of Congress support such a bill each year.

There is more hope at the state level. Almost half the states and the District of Columbia have laws that currently prohibit sexual orientation discrimination in both public and private jobs: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

In addition, a few states have laws prohibiting sexual orientation discrimination in public workplaces only.

If you are gay or lesbian and your state does not have a law that protects you from workplace discrimination, you may still be protected by city and county ordinances. Many cities and counties prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in at least some workplaces.

Suicide is the leading cause of death among gay and lesbian youths. Gay and lesbian youths are 2 to 6 times more likely to attempt suicide than heterosexual youth. Over 30% of all reported teen suicides each year are committed by gay and lesbian youths. . Gays and lesbians are at much higher risk than the heterosexual population for alcohol and drug abuse. Approximately 30% of both the lesbian and gay male populations have problems with alcohol. Gay and lesbian youth are at greater risk for school failure than heterosexual children. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1989, as cited in “Today’s Gay Youth,” n.d., n.p.)

Nevertheless, it appears that the majority of the discrimination against LGBT youths emanates from the schools that they attend. Are schools taking any actions to minimize discrimination against gay students? What are they doing to help these adolescents? The following quote is an explicit example of how schools can contribute to discrimination against LGBT youths:

LGBT youths endure hostile verbal and physical harassment that can be excruciating for them (Human Rights Watch, 2001, p. 35). Human Rights Watch (2001) also states that although the youths that were interviewed emphasized their fear of physical and sexual assault, being called words like “faggot,” “queer,” or “dyke,” daily is still destructive (p.35).

One way of showing support would be for the youths’ parents or family to intervene with the school or at least make an attempt like the mother in the following quote:

Browman (2001) reports that Human Rights Watch completed a two-year study on the topic where an immediate response was obtained from educational groups such as: The National Education Association, The Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Educational Alliance, and The American Federation of Teachers. The three groups adhered in influencing the Education Department to defend and protect gay and lesbian students from discrimination. They add that schools are making an effort to create a safe environment for all students where they can all be treated with equal respect and dignity. Accordingly, the department fights to provide the schools with information and guidance to help solve the problem of discrimination against LGBT youths (Browman, 2001).

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

Gender equality is essential for the achievement of human rights for all. Yet discriminatory laws against women persist in every corner of the globe and new discriminatory laws are enacted. In all legal traditions many laws continue to institutionalize second class status for women and girls with regard to nationality and citizenship, health, education, marital rights, employment rights, parental rights, inheritance and property rights. These forms of discrimination against women are incompatible with women’s empowerment.

Women form the majority of the world’s poorest people and the number of women living in rural poverty has increased by 50% since 1975. Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours and produce half of the world’s food, yet they earn only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property 1 . Violence against women throughout the world and in all cultures prevails on an unimaginable scale, and women’s access to justice is often paired with discriminatory obstacles – in law as well as in practice. Multiple forms of discrimination based on gender and other factors such as race, ethnicity, caste, disability, persons affected by HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation or gender identity further compounds the risk of economic hardship, exclusion and violence against women.

In some countries women, unlike men, cannot dress as they like, drive, work at night, inherit property or give evidence in Court. The vast majority of expressly discriminatory laws in force relate to family life, including limiting a woman’s right to marry (or the right not to marry in cases of early forced marriages), divorce and remarry, thus allowing for sex discriminatory marital practices such as wife obedience and polygamy. Laws explicitly mandating “wife obedience” still govern marital relations in many States.

International human rights law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and includes guarantees for men and women to enjoy their civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights equally. While the human rights machinery reaffirm the principles of non-discrimination and equality, Article 15 (1) of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women explicitly provides that States who have ratified the Convention shall accord to women equality with men and article 2 commits States who have ratified the Convention “to take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices which constitute discrimination against women.” 

Thirty years since the Convention’s entry into force, the recognition and enjoyment of equal rights with men still remains elusive for large sections of women around the world. CEDAW has been ratified by 186 States yet has the record number of reservations to core articles such as articles 2 and 6 which impact upon young girls and women’s personal and family life. 

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

Gender equality is essential for the achievement of human rights for all. Yet discriminatory laws against women persist in every corner of the globe and new discriminatory laws are enacted. In all legal traditions many laws continue to institutionalize second class status for women and girls with regard to nationality and citizenship, health, education, marital rights, employment rights, parental rights, inheritance and property rights. These forms of discrimination against women are incompatible with women’s empowerment.

Women form the majority of the world’s poorest people and the number of women living in rural poverty has increased by 50% since 1975. Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours and produce half of the world’s food, yet they earn only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property 1 . Violence against women throughout the world and in all cultures prevails on an unimaginable scale, and women’s access to justice is often paired with discriminatory obstacles – in law as well as in practice. Multiple forms of discrimination based on gender and other factors such as race, ethnicity, caste, disability, persons affected by HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation or gender identity further compounds the risk of economic hardship, exclusion and violence against women.

In some countries women, unlike men, cannot dress as they like, drive, work at night, inherit property or give evidence in Court. The vast majority of expressly discriminatory laws in force relate to family life, including limiting a woman’s right to marry (or the right not to marry in cases of early forced marriages), divorce and remarry, thus allowing for sex discriminatory marital practices such as wife obedience and polygamy. Laws explicitly mandating “wife obedience” still govern marital relations in many States.

International human rights law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and includes guarantees for men and women to enjoy their civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights equally. While the human rights machinery reaffirm the principles of non-discrimination and equality, Article 15 (1) of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women explicitly provides that States who have ratified the Convention shall accord to women equality with men and article 2 commits States who have ratified the Convention “to take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices which constitute discrimination against women.” 

Thirty years since the Convention’s entry into force, the recognition and enjoyment of equal rights with men still remains elusive for large sections of women around the world. CEDAW has been ratified by 186 States yet has the record number of reservations to core articles such as articles 2 and 6 which impact upon young girls and women’s personal and family life. 

Sexual orientation discrimination includes being treated differently or harassed because of your real or perceived sexual orientation -- whether gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual. This type of discrimination may be illegal in your workplace, depending on where you work.

Although federal laws protect people from workplace discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, religion, sex, age, and disability, there is no federal law that specifically outlaws workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the private sector. (Federal government workers are protected from such discrimination.) Attempts to pass federal legislation that would outlaw sexual orientation discrimination in private workplaces have been unsuccessful to date, although more members of Congress support such a bill each year.

There is more hope at the state level. Almost half the states and the District of Columbia have laws that currently prohibit sexual orientation discrimination in both public and private jobs: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

In addition, a few states have laws prohibiting sexual orientation discrimination in public workplaces only.

If you are gay or lesbian and your state does not have a law that protects you from workplace discrimination, you may still be protected by city and county ordinances. Many cities and counties prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in at least some workplaces.

discimination toward gays in hollywood

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

Gender equality is essential for the achievement of human rights for all. Yet discriminatory laws against women persist in every corner of the globe and new discriminatory laws are enacted. In all legal traditions many laws continue to institutionalize second class status for women and girls with regard to nationality and citizenship, health, education, marital rights, employment rights, parental rights, inheritance and property rights. These forms of discrimination against women are incompatible with women’s empowerment.

Women form the majority of the world’s poorest people and the number of women living in rural poverty has increased by 50% since 1975. Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours and produce half of the world’s food, yet they earn only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property 1 . Violence against women throughout the world and in all cultures prevails on an unimaginable scale, and women’s access to justice is often paired with discriminatory obstacles – in law as well as in practice. Multiple forms of discrimination based on gender and other factors such as race, ethnicity, caste, disability, persons affected by HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation or gender identity further compounds the risk of economic hardship, exclusion and violence against women.

In some countries women, unlike men, cannot dress as they like, drive, work at night, inherit property or give evidence in Court. The vast majority of expressly discriminatory laws in force relate to family life, including limiting a woman’s right to marry (or the right not to marry in cases of early forced marriages), divorce and remarry, thus allowing for sex discriminatory marital practices such as wife obedience and polygamy. Laws explicitly mandating “wife obedience” still govern marital relations in many States.

International human rights law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and includes guarantees for men and women to enjoy their civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights equally. While the human rights machinery reaffirm the principles of non-discrimination and equality, Article 15 (1) of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women explicitly provides that States who have ratified the Convention shall accord to women equality with men and article 2 commits States who have ratified the Convention “to take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices which constitute discrimination against women.” 

Thirty years since the Convention’s entry into force, the recognition and enjoyment of equal rights with men still remains elusive for large sections of women around the world. CEDAW has been ratified by 186 States yet has the record number of reservations to core articles such as articles 2 and 6 which impact upon young girls and women’s personal and family life. 

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...

Gender equality is essential for the achievement of human rights for all. Yet discriminatory laws against women persist in every corner of the globe and new discriminatory laws are enacted. In all legal traditions many laws continue to institutionalize second class status for women and girls with regard to nationality and citizenship, health, education, marital rights, employment rights, parental rights, inheritance and property rights. These forms of discrimination against women are incompatible with women’s empowerment.

Women form the majority of the world’s poorest people and the number of women living in rural poverty has increased by 50% since 1975. Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours and produce half of the world’s food, yet they earn only 10% of the world’s income and own less than 1% of the world’s property 1 . Violence against women throughout the world and in all cultures prevails on an unimaginable scale, and women’s access to justice is often paired with discriminatory obstacles – in law as well as in practice. Multiple forms of discrimination based on gender and other factors such as race, ethnicity, caste, disability, persons affected by HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation or gender identity further compounds the risk of economic hardship, exclusion and violence against women.

In some countries women, unlike men, cannot dress as they like, drive, work at night, inherit property or give evidence in Court. The vast majority of expressly discriminatory laws in force relate to family life, including limiting a woman’s right to marry (or the right not to marry in cases of early forced marriages), divorce and remarry, thus allowing for sex discriminatory marital practices such as wife obedience and polygamy. Laws explicitly mandating “wife obedience” still govern marital relations in many States.

International human rights law prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and includes guarantees for men and women to enjoy their civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights equally. While the human rights machinery reaffirm the principles of non-discrimination and equality, Article 15 (1) of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women explicitly provides that States who have ratified the Convention shall accord to women equality with men and article 2 commits States who have ratified the Convention “to take all appropriate measures, including legislation, to modify or abolish existing laws, regulations, customs and practices which constitute discrimination against women.” 

Thirty years since the Convention’s entry into force, the recognition and enjoyment of equal rights with men still remains elusive for large sections of women around the world. CEDAW has been ratified by 186 States yet has the record number of reservations to core articles such as articles 2 and 6 which impact upon young girls and women’s personal and family life. 

Sexual orientation discrimination includes being treated differently or harassed because of your real or perceived sexual orientation -- whether gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual. This type of discrimination may be illegal in your workplace, depending on where you work.

Although federal laws protect people from workplace discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, religion, sex, age, and disability, there is no federal law that specifically outlaws workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the private sector. (Federal government workers are protected from such discrimination.) Attempts to pass federal legislation that would outlaw sexual orientation discrimination in private workplaces have been unsuccessful to date, although more members of Congress support such a bill each year.

There is more hope at the state level. Almost half the states and the District of Columbia have laws that currently prohibit sexual orientation discrimination in both public and private jobs: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

In addition, a few states have laws prohibiting sexual orientation discrimination in public workplaces only.

If you are gay or lesbian and your state does not have a law that protects you from workplace discrimination, you may still be protected by city and county ordinances. Many cities and counties prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in at least some workplaces.

This is an illustrated guide to civil liberties issues impacting lesbians and gay men, as well as bisexuals living in lesbian or gay relationships. Some of the issues below also impact transgender persons, though I believe that issues affecting transgender persons are distinct enough to warrant an additional page.

Because HIV and AIDS disproportionately affect gay men, and because homophobia has played and still plays a role in widespread government failure to adequately address issues impacting HIV-positive Americans, many gay rights organizations are also involved in HIV-AIDS activism .

According to the most recent hate crime statistics, roughly 15% of bias-motivated crimes are committed on the basis of perceived sexual orientation.

Under current FDA guidelines, gay men are not allowed to donate blood unless they have been celibate for at least five years.

Political leaders often savagely condemn alleged lesbian and gay promiscuity during speeches in support of legislation that punishes lesbian and gay monogamy.

About 80,000 foster children go unadopted every year. Thousands of childless same-sex couples want to adopt. The solution is obvious, but there's a problem...